2015 Conference Speaker Biographies

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September 28th:

8:30 AM – Opening Keynote #1

Welcome from Conference Co-Chairs  Anne Marks and Tony  Zepeda,  Dr.  J. Nadine Gracia, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health

Anne Marks is the Executive Director of Youth ALIVE!, the nonprofit organization that founded NNHVIP and remains committed to its mission of preventing violence and developing youth leadership. Youth ALIVE!’s Caught in the Crossfire program, founded in 1994, was the nation’s first hospital-based violence intervention program. Before joining Youth ALIVE!, Anne administered the City of Oakland’s prison reentry strategies and then, after the passage of a local Measure Y, oversaw $6 million annually of violence prevention strategies. She has done communications for the U.S. State Department, a presidential campaign, and local initiatives. She received a Master of Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School, focusing on strategic management and public relations.

Dr. J. Nadine Gracia is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health and the Director of the Office of Minority Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The Office of Minority Health is dedicated to improving the health of racial and ethnic minority populations through the development of health policies and programs that will help eliminate health disparities. Under Dr. Gracia’s leadership, the Office of Minority Health oversees the implementation of the HHS Action Plan to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities and the National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities.

A pediatrician with epidemiology training, Dr. Gracia previously served as Chief Medical Officer for the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health. Dr. Gracia is a former White House Fellow, serving at HHS in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health and the Office of the Secretary. She also served as a policy advisor in the Office of the First Lady, assisting in the development of the Let’s Move! initiative to solve childhood obesity.

Tony Zepeda began organizing with the Community Coalition for Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment in Los Angeles, where he helped start and staff, South Central Youth Empowered thru Action.  He then became an Advisor to California Wellness Foundation’s Children and Youth Community Health Initiative (CYCHI).  He was subsequently was hired by Education Training and Research (ETR) Associates as the Youth Coordinator for The California Wellness Foundation CYCHI initiative, providing Technical Assistance and training for 16 sites in California, around community youth development and peer driven programming, community outreach, recruitment and retention.  He has taught Community/Youth Organizing 101 with Trade Tech Community College in Los Angeles and worked internationally with the Institute for Culture Affairs around issues or race and violence. Mr. Zepeda also worked closely inside Corcoran’s lifer yard and Walden House Substance Abuse Program yards throughout California.

11:00 AM – Breakout Session #1

Track A: Best Practices for Frontline Workers: S.E.L.F. : Creating Stronger, Safer Communities, One Story at a Time

Rich Baccare is currently a Community Intervention Specialist with Healing Hurt People’s pediatric site at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children providing on-going trauma-informed services to youth and their families following intentional injuries. Rich is a licensed social worker who has co-facilitated SELF groups for adolescent boys and girls affected by community violence for the past three years. Rich graduated with his Master of Social Service degree from Bryn Mawr College and has significant experience working with issues of gender, sexuality, intimate partner violence and sexual offending.

Natasha Holt is a community Intervention Specialist for the Healing Hurt People Program at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, providing on-going trauma-informed services to youth and their families following intentional injuries. Natasha is a licensed social worker who has co-facilitated SELF groups for adolescent boys and girls affected by community violence throughout the past year. Natasha graduated with a Master of Social Work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and holds a Graduate Diploma in International Peace and Conflict Resolution from the Duke University-UNC Peace Centre. She has a background in International Development specializing in sexual health and gender advocacy.

Ruth Ann Ryan, MSN, CS is a Board Certified Clinical Nurse Specialist, a co-founder of the Sanctuary Programs and co-author of the S.E.L.F. Psychoeducational curriculum, a trauma-informed model for recovery  in use at the Healing Hurt People programs in Philadelphia and many other settings throughout the country. She is a Psychoeducation Training Specialist with  Healing Hurt People and a consultant on strategies for building trauma informed organizations and communities. She received her Master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania and currently teaches in the Community and Trauma Masters in Counseling Program at Philadelphia University.

Hugh Thompson (a.k.a. Tony) is a Community Intervention Specialist for the Healing Hurt People program at Hahnemann University Hospital and has been a part of the Healing Hurt People program since 2009. Tony holds a BSW from Temple University and brings to HHP a broad range of youth development skills with a focus on at-risk youth living in urban environments. Previously, Tony worked at New York’s Callen-Lorde Community Health Center for LGBT communities and persons living with HIV/AIDS and the East Side House Settlement social service organization in the South Bronx. Tony is a social worker who has co-facilitated SELF groups and provided intensive case management using the SELF model to youth affected by community violence for the past 6 years.

Shardae Wescott is currently a Community Intervention Specialist with the Healing Hurt People program at Hahnemann University Hospital. Shardae currently provides on-going trauma-informed services to adolescents and adults following intentional injuries. Shardae is a licensed social worker who has co-facilitated SELF groups for adult males and females affected by community violence. She graduated with a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Pennsylvania and has significant experience working with children and youth as a liaison to the Department of Human Services in Philadelphia.

Track B: From Policy to Practice: Legislation Come to Life to Train & Fund HVIPs

Linnea Ashley is a public health professional with extensive domestic and international public health experience. As the National Training and Advocacy Manager at Youth ALIVE! she manages research projects on trauma symptoms and advocates on the local and state level for violence prevention measures. She is also the Manager for the National Network of Hospital-based Violence Intervention Programs.

Robin Foemmel Bie, L.C.S.W. has been with the Victim Compensation and Government Claims Board (VCGCB) since October 2007.  During her tenure at VCGCB Ms. Foemmel Bie has held various management positions within the California Victim Compensation Program and currently serves as the Resource Branch Manager. Prior to joining the VCGCB, Ms. Foemmel Bie worked from 2000 to 2005 at the California Department of Social Services in child welfare by providing adoption services to dependents of the court. Ms. Foemmel Bie worked at the California Mental Health and Department from 2005 to 2007 in Child and Family Policy.  Her focus was on county mental health services provided to children through an individualized education program. Ms. Foemmel Bie earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Minnesota State University, Mankato, and a Master of Social Work from California State University, San Jose.

Track C: Research Tips and Tools:  Through the Muck and Mire: Research Ethics for HVIPs

Melissa Bayne, PhD received her doctorate in Social Developmental Psychology from the University of California Santa Cruz and is the Manager of Youth Development Programs for WellSpace Health in Sacramento, California. Dr. Bayne has 10 years of experience administering health and human service programs (addressing youth development, homeless services and community violence intervention) and is an Adjunct Professor of Psychology at California State University Sacramento. She has presented at leading public health and social services conferences including NNHVIP, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Public Health Association, Institute for Violence Abuse and Trauma and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues.

Carnell Cooper, MD is the Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer of Dimensions Healthcare System and the Medical Director of Trauma Services and Vice President of Medical Affairs at Prince George’s Hospital Center in Maryland/D.C. metropolitan area.  He is also an Associate Professor of Surgery at the University Of Maryland School Of Medicine and an attending physician at the University of Maryland R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore.  He attended Yale University and received his M.D. at Duke University.  Dr. Cooper’s research interests have focused on issues related to violence, the mechanism of grain injury, and the diagnoses of blunt bowel injury, and has authored many peer-reviewed publications on these topics.

Joel A. Fein MD, MPH is a Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania and an attending physician in the Emergency Department at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).  He has been involved in hospital-based violence prevention programming and research for more than two decades, and is a Co-Director of the National Network of Hospital-based Violence Intervention Programs (NNHVIP) and the Director of the CHOP Violence Prevention Initiative.  He is also the director of outreach for The Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress, an intervention development center within the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, and a co-chair of the Philadelphia ACES Task Force, a coalition of regional stakeholders who introduce ACES knowledge into programs, curricula and research. At CHOP he is an attending physician and Director of Advocacy and Health Policy for the Emergency Department and the medical advisor to the Government Affairs, Community Relations and Advocacy Department

Marlene Melzer-Lange, MD received her medical degree from the Medical College of Wisconsin and completed her pediatric residency at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. As a pediatric emergency medicine physician she has witnessed the devastation of youth violence. She serves as medical director for Project Ujima, a long-standing violence intervention program. She is a Professor of Pediatrics at the Medical College of Wisconsin and her scholarly interest is violence and violence intervention amongst youth victims of violence. She has presented violence intervention topics at NNHVIP as well as other national and international conferences.

Track D: Trauma-informed Practices: Spiritual Practices as Practical Clinical Interventions for the Healer

Father Stan Bosch, S.T., Psy. D. holds a doctoral degree in psychology with an emphasis in Marriage and Family Therapy from the California Graduate Institute of the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  He is a psychotherapist, Co-Director of Mental Health/Personnel Development for gang intervention and staff workers with Soledad Enrichment Action (SEA) and the City of Los Angeles’ Gang Reduction and Youth Development Project (GRYD) as well as ‘Caught in the Crossfire’.  He also maintains a private practice in psychotherapy in South Los Angeles specializing in psychodynamic group and individual psychotherapy treating early trauma/abuse, depression, addictions and gang related issues. In these past years, Fr. Stan’s work with inner city youth was featured in the National Geographic documentary “Inside LA Gang Wars”, as well as in the Los Angeles Times August 2009: “Let’s Talk About It!”

Dr. Cervantes is a clinical psychologist in independent practice in the area of child/family forensic psychology and a tenured professor, Department of Counseling, School of Health and Human Development, California State University, Fullerton. Dr. Cervantes has published in the area of clinical spirituality in peer reviewed journals including a chapter in this topic area with Dr. Bosch. They are currently co-writing a book entitled Spiritual Practices for Mental Health Professionals.

Track E: Healing the Healers: Resilience Training: Practical Mindfulness and Self-Compassion

 

Eric Lopez-Maya has an extensive background practicing mindfulness and integrating it into different scenarios in workplaces and clinical settings. He is Director and Founder of the Mexican Institute for Mindfulness, a leading Institution in Mexico that offers mindfulness-based interventions for mental health, wellbeing and stress reduction, both for companies and the general public. He also collaborates with the UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center as a guest lecturer and serves as a Postdoctoral fellow at the Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology at UCLA. He is a clinical psychologist and holds a PhD in Health Psychology and has led and collaborated in contemplative research projects in Mexico, United States and Germany. He holds a certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation from UCLA and has completed professional training in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) through the programs offered by the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He is also a Guiding Teacher for the Mindful Schools Program.

 

2:00 PM – Breakout Session #2

Track A: Personal Safety Best Practices for Frontline Staff

Kyndra Simmons, MS a Berkeley, California native began working with at-risk youth in 1995 while working with the AmeriCorps Program. Kyndra worked with youth in mental health treatment facilities for seven years and noticed that a lot of issues youth face daily are issues stemming from their home and neighborhoods. It was at this time when Kyndra decided to explore other avenues of supporting youth in urban communities. Kyndra has worked with Youth ALIVE! since 2002, starting as an Intervention Specialist and later promoted to Caught in the Crossfire’s Program Manager. As Program Manager, Kyndra continues to maintain her initial position as Intervention Specialist in order to continue working with young people and their families in not only the city of Oakland, but throughout Alameda County.

Rafael Vasquez, Born in El Salvador and raised in San Francisco, California and later moved to Indonesia. In Indonesia, Rafael worked with youth in various capacities but mainly focusing on youth struggling with substance abuse issues. Rafael later returned to the United States and began working for Youth ALIVE! in 2006, as an Intervention Specialist. Rafael continues use his personal and professional experience to successfully work with Oakland’s highest risk and gang involved youth and families in crisis within Alameda County. Rafael’s current position as Youth ALIVE’S Caught in the Crossfire Program Coordinator allows Rafael to share his expertise with all current Intervention Specialist and train all new Intervention Specialist.

Track B: Building a bridge between gang intervention and domestic violence

Karyna Gonzalez is the YWCA of Glendale’s Director of Domestic Violence Programs. Ms. Gonzalez has a degree in Human Services with a focus on “at-risk” families as well as completion of CalEMA certified 40 hour Domestic Violence (DV) Training. Prior to working with the YWCA Domestic Violence Program, she worked for more than a decade with “at-risk” youth and families. Ms. Gonzalez continuously strives to maintain the DV program within the high expectations of funders, as well as the mission of the YWCA of Glendale, which is to serve victims during their recovery towards self-empowerment and an independent life free from violence. Ms. Gonzalez’ professional experiences regularly garners both local and international speaking opportunities to share her views and strategies on domestic violence. community building, personal development,  overall leadership philosophies and team-building strategies. Ms. Gonzalez strongly advocates the idea that the development of a healthy family leads to a healthy community. In furtherance of this goal, Ms. Gonzalez educates and mentors community leaders to institute programs that promote the well-being of all individuals within their community. She currently is developing curriculum in conjunction with the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office highlighting the nexus between domestic violence and gang violence. She is also an active member of the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence’s Public Policy and Research Committee, Los Angeles DV Council,

and Glendale’s Continuum of Care.

 

Eve Sheedy, Esq. is Counsel for Domestic Violence Policy in the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office.  In this capacity, she works with prosecutors, police, service providers and other government officials to protect the safety and rights of domestic violence victims and their children.  Eve is the Chair of the City of Los Angeles Domestic Violence Task Force, Co-Chair and Founder of the DV/Gang Nexus Committee and an elected Board Member of the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence, the statewide domestic violence coalition.  In conjunction with Channel 35, Eve produced “Violence Connected,”  a documentary film about the overlap of domestic violence and gang violence that has been shown throughout the country.  Eve provides training locally, throughout California and nationally on a number of domestic violence topics ranging from restraining orders to the connection of domestic violence to gang violence.  Eve is the recipient of awards from the City of Los Angeles Domestic Violence Task Force and the County of Los Angeles Domestic Violence Council for her work addressing the domestic violence/gang violence connection.    Prior to her present position, Eve headed the Domestic Violence Prosecution Unit at the Santa Monica City Attorney’s Office.  Thereafter, Eve founded WorkSafe, a domestic violence threat assessment and management company.  She has also worked as a civil litigator and a deputy public defender. Eve graduated from Phillips ExeterAcademy, received her B.A. from Haverford College, an received her J.D. from Boston University School of Law.

Raymundo Zacarias is an Example that reentry works, having served 4 years 3 months in prison! Raymundo Zacarias has his Master’s in Social Work from the University of Southern California and has worked with both high risk youth and reentry adults for the past ten years.  He has also worked with individuals from drug court, parolees, probation gang youth and their families. Mr. Zacarias is the Executive VP of Programs for Communities In Schools of the San Fernando Valley Greater Los Angeles Area, he is currently in charge of supervising case management and providing service to the largest Gang Reduction & Youth Development contract for the city of Los Angeles. Mr. Zacarias is also part of the Domestic Violence/Gang Nexus training committee which is currently providing joint informational trainings by DV service provides and intervention service providers regarding the co-relationship of gang violence and domestic violence. He also co-supervises 12 MSW interns from five accredited California Universities: UCLA, USC, CSULA, CSUDH, and CSUN. He instructs them how to further their skills in case management, counseling gang youth/reentry adults from beginning to end. Lastly, Mr. Zacarias is a reentry success.

Track C: Randomized Controlled Trials

Dr. Carolyn Snider is an emergency physician and Associate Professor at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. She obtained a MPH in injury epidemiology from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2007. Dr. Snider’s primary research focus is the design, implementation and evaluation of interventions for preventing youth violence. Dr. Snider practices mixed method research, using large administrative databases, community based participatory research, concept mapping and clinical trial methodologies – all with an integrated knowledge translation approach.  Dr. Snider is currently conducting a randomized control trial entitled WrapAround Care for Youth Injured by Violence.

Katherine Bakes, MD attended Harvard Medical School and completed her Emergency Medicine residency at Harbor UCLA, where she also served as chief resident and was the first Harbor fellow in Emergency Medicine Ultrasound. Currently, Dr. Bakes is the director of At-Risk Intervention and Mentoring (AIM), Denver Health’s hospital-based violence intervention program, co-chair of the Injury Prevention committee, and the physician liaison for community outreach for Denver Health. She is an Associate Professor in the department of Emergency Medicine at University of Colorado, School of Medicine. She is an editor of Emergency Medicine Secrets, 9th Edition of Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice, and New England Journal of Medicine, Journal Watch Emergency Medicine.

Sara Muramoto has been AIM Program Manager since 2012. Working closely with Dr. Bakes over the past 3 years, the pair has applied and received 3 grants. Sara has worked directly with youth providing brief interventions and case management, as well as managing the programs finances, coordinating community endeavors, and designing and overseeing research studies related to the program.

Track D: Addressing Community Level Trauma for community healing and violence prevention + Violence through Hospital Programs within an Integrated Health System

Howard Pinderhughes, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Pinderhughes is the author of “Race in the Hood: Conflict and Violence Among Urban Youth,” which examines the dynamics of racial violence in New York City. His forthcoming book, “Dealing With Danger: How Inner-City Youth Cope with the Violence that Surrounds Them,” examines how urban adolescents think about, experience, and make decisions about the use of violence and the effects of trauma from exposure to interpersonal and structural violence on both youth and communities. Dr. Pinderhughes served as a co- investigator for the Center on Culture, Immigration and Youth Violence Prevention, one of the Academic Centers of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Myesha Williams, MSW is a Program Coordinator at Prevention Institute focusing on health equity and injury, violence and trauma prevention.  Myesha partnered with Dr. Pinderhughes on the community trauma project, including conducting interviews with people from organizations working in high violence communities throughout northern California. Recently she provided technical assistance and facilitation support for the development of Baltimore City’s Blueprint to Prevent Violence Affecting Youth, one of the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention Sites. She helped coordinate the convening for the UNITY initiative, Urban Networks to Increase Thriving Youth. She brings with her the knowledge and skills of engaging youth in the process of building safe and healthy communities.

Lori Toscano is the Director of Health Partnerships at Cure Violence and leads the organization in establishing relationships with health organization, government entities, faith based organizations, hospitals, and universities. Previously, Ms. Toscano was the Director of the Safe Streets program, which implemented the Cure Violence model in four communities in Baltimore and was successfully evaluate by Johns Hopkins University. Ms. Toscano has a Master’s of Science in Criminal Justice from The University of Baltimore.

Shannon Cosgrove is the Director of Health Innovation for Cure Violence. She is a graduate of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Public Health Prevention Service Program and former chair of the Health Equity and Social Justice Committee.  Shannon served as a peer behavioral interventionist and as the grant coordinator at the Centre for Volunteers in Medicine while receiving her MHA and BSc from the Pennsylvania State University.

Track E: Healing the Healers: Resilience Training: Practical Mindfulness and Self-Compassion

 

Eric Lopez-Maya has an extensive background practicing mindfulness and integrating it into different scenarios in workplaces and clinical settings. He is Director and Founder of the Mexican Institute for Mindfulness, a leading Institution in Mexico that offers mindfulness-based interventions for mental health, wellbeing and stress reduction, both for companies and the general public. He also collaborates with the UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center as a guest lecturer and serves as a Postdoctoral fellow at the Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology at UCLA. He is a clinical psychologist and holds a PhD in Health Psychology and has led and collaborated in contemplative research projects in Mexico, United States and Germany. He holds a certificate in Mindfulness Facilitation from UCLA and has completed professional training in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) through the programs offered by the University of Massachusetts Medical School. He is also a Guiding Teacher for the Mindful Schools Program.

3:50 PM: 1st Day Closing Plenary

My Brother’s Keeper: Panel on How We Can Get Systems of Care to Support Men of Color

John A. Rich, MD, MPH, is Professor at the Drexel University School of Public Health. He has been a leader in the field of public health, and his work has focused on serving one of the nation’s most ignored and underserved populations—African-American men in urban settings. As a primary care doctor at Boston Medical Center, Rich created the Young Men’s Health Clinic and initiated the Boston HealthCREW, a program to train inner city young men to become peer health educators who focus on the health of men and boys in their communities. He earned his Dartmouth A.B. degree in English, his M.D. from Duke University Medical School, and his Master’s from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Ray Colmenar is responsible for shaping and implementing The Endowment’s programmatic strategy to improve the community and neighborhood environments so that they promote health.  He is also co-leading The Endowment’s Heath Happens w/all our Sons & Brothers efforts which is aimed at improving the health of boys and young men of color—a key cross-cutting program priority of the Building Healthy Communities strategy.  Prior to joining The Endowment, Colmenar was an associate director at PolicyLink, a national nonprofit research, communications, capacity building and advocacy organization. He received his bachelor’s in Management Science from the University of California, San Diego; master’s in Public Policy from the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley.

Cedric Brown is the Chief of Community Engagement at the Kapor Center for Social Impact. He has over 20 years of experience as a funder and activist, steering over $60 million in grants to community efforts. In his current role, he works to devise and implement strategies to build a tech community that mirrors the dynamically diverse population of the United States. His recent projects include collaborations with the White House Office of Science and Tech Policy, #YesWeCode, 2.Oakland, Breaking.IT.Down, and Vator Splash Oakland.

Cedric is the founder of Brothers Code, the Oakland Summit on Blacks in Tech, and is co-founder of the College Bound Brotherhood, an initiative working in five Bay Area school districts to increase the number of African American college enrollees and graduates. He was recognized as a Champion for Change by Startup Weekend Oakland – Black Male Achievement, a Champion for Youth by the East Oakland Development Center, and as a Changemaker by the San Francisco Chronicle. He was profiled on TheRoot.com for his leadership participation in President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative. Building on his professional experiences, he launched the Springboard Award, a small family fund prize to support the personal development aspirations of African American young men in Oakland, CA and his hometown of Winston-Salem, NC.

Cedric is a proud board member and supporter of Color of Change. He holds degrees from the University of North Carolina and Stanford University.

A partner at Goodwin Simon Strategic Research, Amy Simon brings 20 years of political experience to her work as a pollster and communications strategist. She conducts research on a variety of public policy issues and her clients include state and local government, non-profits, labor unions, and both political and candidate committees. Ms. Simon serves on the Board of Directors of PeacePAC and Emerge America and is a contributing author to True to Ourselves, a collection of essays by prominent American women. Ms. Simon graduated with Honors from the University of Michigan in 1987. She studied at the Joint Program in Survey Methodology (Universities of Maryland and Michigan).

Terrance Pitts is a program officer for the Justice Fund at the Open Society Foundations. Previously, he served as a program officer with the Academy for Educational Development, where he designed and implemented leadership development strategies to support emerging social justice leaders through the New Voices Fellowship Program. Pitts earned a JD from Northwestern University School of Law, a master of arts in law and diplomacy from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, and an AB from Stanford University.

September 29th:

9:00 AM – 2nd Day Opening Plenary

Both Sides of the Bedside: Panel on the Hospital Experience, for Doctors and Patients

Marla Becker, MPH was the first National Director of NNHVIP and worked in the field of violence prevention for 13 years at Youth ALIVE!, a non-profit dedicated to preventing youth violence and developing youth leaders in Oakland, CA. Marla’s published work includes two evaluations of the Caught in the Crossfire program and co-authoring Violence is Preventable: A Best Practices Guide for Launching & Sustaining a Hospital-based Program to Break the Cycle of Violence.

Dr. Damon Clark obtained his medical degree in 2004 from Harvard Medical School, one of the top medical schools in the country. He trained for his general surgery residency at both Eastern Virginia Medical School and Henry Ford Hospital and completed his residency in 2010. He recently completed a 2-year fellowship in Surgical Critical Care and Acute Care Surgery at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center/University of Maryland Medical Center, one of the most renowned trauma and surgical critical care training centers in the world.

In his young academic career, Dr. Clark has completed five research fellowships in the areas of surgical and molecular chemistry and pharmaceuticals. He has presented his work in abstract form 13 times and has four peer-reviewed articles to his credit. This work does not include several of his other research projects that are under evaluation for publication and/or presentation, including a large series on the impact of a web-based radiology service to reduce the need for unnecessary repeat radiographic tests.

He recently received from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma, the Oriens Award. In addition, he was awarded the 2011 Best Preceptor for Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (CSTARS) from R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma/University of Maryland Medical Center. During his general surgery training he was awarded the 2010 “Medical Student Teacher of the Year”.

Caheri Gutierrez, an Oakland native, began working in violence prevention after surviving a gunshot to her face.  As a Youth ALIVE! client, she committed to overcoming her injury and healing in mind, body and spirit.  The care and concern she received as a client motivated her to dedicate her life to serving those in her community impacted by violence.  Caheri is currently a Teens on Target (TNT) Case Manager and Violence Prevention Educator with Youth ALIVE! She serves high school kids in Oakland and in the long term, sees herself fulfilling her dream of becoming a nurse and working specifically with victims of violence.

Jackie Holland-Baldwin joined the Project Ujima team in spring 2015.  She has a wealth of experience in Child Welfare, group home settings, and in the classroom environment.  Jackie is passionate about being a lifelong learner and is working towards her Bachelors in Human Services at Upper Iowa University.  Although she recently joined the Project Ujima team as an employee, she joined the Ujima family in summer 2009 when her son was a victim of gun violence in Milwaukee.  Jackie is a strong advocate for violence prevention and uses her voice to stand up for her family, her clients, and her community.  Jackie is the wonderful mother of two biological children and three adopted children. She is a dedicated wife, mother, and daughter of Christ.

Thea James, MD is an Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Boston Medical Center/Boston University School of Medicine. Dr. James created a violence intervention program in the Emergency Department at Boston City Hospital (now Boston Medical Center) and is deeply involved in medical disaster relief both domestically and internationally. Dr. James is the 2008 awardee of the Mulligan Award and president-elect of the Boston Medical and Dental Staff.

10:20 AM: Breakout Session #3

Track A: Identifying Interdisciplinary Communication Needs for the Patient Experiencing Community Violence + Parents for Peace Support Group

Maria Banda immigrated from Mexico in 1971 and has four children. Maria’s son survived a gunshot injury and today Maria is an active member in the Parents for Peace Support group at ALC+USC Medical Center.

Arquimedes Barrera has served as Case Manager for Soledad Enrichment Action’s (SEA) Caught in the Crossfire program at LAC+USC Medical Center for more than 3 years. Mr. Barrera conducts daily bedside visits and post-discharge case management services such as medical coverage and follow-up care, ancillary services assistance (advocacy, enrollment/re-enrollment in school, employment services, life skills training, and housing assistance). He also conducts the weekly Parents for Peace Support Group at LAC+USC Medical Center, works in tandem with clinical social workers in linking patients and their families to resources, and refer and link the patients to the local Victim Assistance Program.

Samantha Wright Calero leads the Violence Prevention and Recovery Programs at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA. She oversees prevention initiatives that address cycles of violence including intimate partner abuse, commercial sexual exploitation/ trafficking, as well as community violence. Particularly, her work focuses on how these traumatic cycles co-occur and mediate one another for young people and their families. The Violence Recovery Program provides crisis intervention and trauma- informed advocacy for patients of the BWH who are admitted for violent assaults. Sam’s programmatic work ranges from engaging individuals around their experiences of survival to addressing the social determinants of peace and safety. Sam’s work blends applied research, direct interventions and grassroots capacity- building through a racial, and gender justice lens.

Robert Carreon has been a Registered Nurse (RN) at LAC+USC Medical Center for 11 years. Mr. Carreon has worked as a Nurse in the Medical/Surgical Units of the hospital and provided care for trauma patients. Carreon is currently the Injury Prevention Coordinator for LAC+USC Medical Center.

Alma Flores immigrated from Mexico in 1990. She is the mother of six children. In separate incidents, both Alma’s son and husband were victims of crimes that resulted in their deaths. Today she is an active member in the Parents for Peace Support group at ALC+USC Medical Center.

Sixta Navarrete, RN, has worked at LAC+USC Medical Center for more than 27 years. Ms. Navarette has held numerous professional positions at LAC+USC Medical Center, including her current position as the Trauma Department Manager.

Track B:: Effective Partnerships between Law Enforcement and Public Health Providers to Reduce Youth Violence

Medina Henry of the Center for Court Innovation spearheads technical assistance for the 9 sites funded by the Minority Youth Violence Prevention initiative, collaboration between the Office of Minority Health at the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Office at the US Department of Justice. Since 2014, Medina has also been an Associate Director of Training and Technical Assistance at the Center for Court Innovation. She began her career at the Center shortly after earning her Master of Public Administration at Baruch College. Medina started as the program coordinator for the Center’s AmeriCorps program and was promoted to planner for the Red Hook Community Justice Center. While in Red Hook she helped the Justice Center to plan and launch the Red Hook Responders, a social service program created in response to Superstorm Sandy; Red Hook Cares, a new victim services program; and a host of other projects.

Sheryl Sams is the Program Director for the Youth Intercept Program with Victim Witness under the auspices of the Chatham County District Attorney’s Office. She joined the Chatham County District Attorney’s Office in November, 2011.Sheryl received her Master’s in Public Administration from Savannah State University and her Bachelor’s in Applied Professional Science from the University of South Carolina. Sheryl possess over 20 years of combined management experience in the public and private sector.  She brings a wealth of experience in program implementation and design, research, strategic planning, case management, and program evaluation. Her human service experience extends to working with victims of crime, at risk youth, homeless women and children, and housing discrimination. During her human service career, she has been recognized for her work in the community and was featured on the Crime Stoppers Program, SKIRT magazine, and the Connect.

John Torres is Deputy Director of Youth ALIVE! and a lead trainer with the National Network of Hospital-based Violence Intervention Programs, has a rich background in case management, crisis response and trauma support. Before joining Youth ALIVE! in 2009, he led the City and County of San Francisco’s Crisis Response Network for the Department of Children, Youth and Families (DCYF). In recognition of his service to the community, he was awarded the “Warrior of Peace” Award by the Mission District Peace Collaborative. John received his B.A. from San Francisco State University and Masters in Counseling from the California Institute of Integral Studies. In addition to his other duties, John provides therapy to young people at Youth ALIVE! as a pre-license MFT intern.

Track C: Violence Intervention Program Registry Overview

Rochelle Dicker, MD is the Director of the UCSF/San Francisco Wraparound Project at San Francisco General Hospital. She is double boarded in General Surgery and Critical Care. Her interests include violence prevention and the development of systems for mass casualty and trauma in the developing world. Dr. Dicker is Assistant Professor of Surgery at UCSF and practices at San Francisco General Hospital, the only Level 1 Trauma Center in San Francisco.

Michael Jarrett is the founder and President of QuesGen Systems, Inc, a company that provides data management for clinical research. He has over 20 years of experience in developing and running organizations that provide data management technology to a specific requirement and for the last 11 years, he has been running QuesGen. He has been involved with a number of startup organizations and several large ones, including Andersen Business Consulting where he ran the Advanced Technology Practice for the western region and Informix software, where he was responsible for running all customer service and consulting functions.

Track D: Practical Tips and Tools for serving Trauma Impacted Clients

Nicky MacCallum, LMFT, NCC, is the Chair of the Mental Health Working Group for the National Network of Hospital-based Violence Intervention Programs and the Clinical Director at Youth ALIVE! Nicky is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, nationally certified counselor and CAMFT-certified clinical supervisor. She conducts trainings on trauma-informed practices and vicarious trauma throughout the Bay Area and nationally as well. Nicky has been providing quality psychological services to children, adolescents, transition-age youth and their families for more than 25 years. She was a Collaborative Investigator for the DSM-5 field trials contributing on Trauma and Stressor-Related Disorders as well as Depressive Disorders. Ms. MacCallum has experience collaborating with child protective services, victims of crime services, family reunification, diversion programs, juvenile justice, community mental health, foster care, residential services, school based programs and hospital-based programs. Ms. MacCallum holds a bachelor’s degree (with honors) in performing arts from the University of London, Goldsmith’s College (UK) and a master’s degree in Marriage and Family Counseling from San Francisco State University.

Kyndra Simmons, MS Youth ALIVE! Caught in the Crossfire Program Manager, a Berkeley, California native began working with at-risk youth in 1995 while working with the AmeriCorps Program. Kyndra worked with youth in mental health treatment facilities for seven years and noticed that a lot of issues youth face daily are issues stemming from their home and neighborhoods. It was at this time when Kyndra decided to explore other avenues of supporting youth in urban communities. Kyndra has worked with Youth ALIVE! since 2002, starting as an Intervention Specialist and later promoted to Caught in the Crossfire’s Program Manager and Lead Trainer for the National Network of Hospital-based Violence Intervention Programs.  While working at Youth ALIVE, Kyndra has completed Undergraduate degrees in both Psychology and Criminal Justice, and most recently completed her Masters of Science in Psychology.  Youth ALIVE’s Caught in the Crossfire program is the country’s first Hospital-Based Violence Intervention program to serve violently injured youth with the goals of  promoting positive alternatives to violence and to reduce retaliation, re-injury, and arrest. As Program Manager, Kyndra continues to maintain her initial position as Intervention Specialist in order to continue working with young people and their families in not only the city of Oakland, but throughout Alameda County.

Track E: Healing the Healers

Jason Ryterband is a Los Angeles-based mindfulness facilitator. He provides practical, relationship-centric guidance, leveraging mindfulness tools to cultivate empathy and enrich interpersonal connections. Using a combination of traditional Vipassana meditation techniques and modern psychological research, Jason empowers people to move toward more secure, authentic ways of being in the world.

1:20 pm – Breakout Session # 4

Track A: Healing Works! Lessons on Practice and Community-Building for People Working with Young Male Survivors of Color

Charlene Allen, Esq. has worked with survivors of crime and trauma for more than twenty years as an attorney, advocate, and educator. In the late 1980s, she led one of the first statewide domestic violence coalitions as Lobbyist/Organizer for Jane Doe, Inc., and later served as Executive Director of the Boston Area Rape Crisis Center, and Supervising Attorney at Northeastern University Law School’s Domestic Violence Law Clinic. Recognizing the need to address violence and trauma in a context that confronts systemic oppression and also provides mechanisms for accountability, Charlene served as Legal Director of Emerge, the first abuser education program in the United States. For the past decade, she has been a member of the Criminal Justice Initiative, a national funding collective that supports community-based organizations combatting exploitation, abuse, and racial bias within the criminal justice system.

Track B: Novel Reimbursement Strategies for Violence Prevention: Information, Discussion and Collaboration

Carnell Cooper, MD is the Program Director of the Violence Prevention Program, under which, the Violence Intervention Program operates. He and his team completed the largest concurrent case-control study to date on intentional victims of violence, which was the first randomized, prospective evaluation of a hospital-based violence prevention program. Dr. Cooper is Associate Professor of Surgery at the University Of Maryland School Of Medicine, a member of the Association of Academic Minority Physicians, the Chief of Trauma Services at Prince George’s Hospital Center, and an Attending at the RA Cowley Shock Trauma Center. In 2009, Dr. Cooper was honored as one of CNN’s Heroes for his amazing work.

Kyle Fischer is currently a health policy fellow and emergency physician with the University of Maryland.  He received his MD and MPH from the University of Wisconsin- Madison.  While completing his emergency medicine residency at Drexel University, he became active with the Healing Hurt People program, performing research on public policy and violence intervention programs.  He is now the co-chair of the NNHVIP policy workgroup.

Jonathan Purtle, DrPH, MSc is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Management & Policy at the Drexel University School of Public Health. His research focuses on mixed methods approaches to understanding the sociopolitical contexts in which policy is made and implemented, developing effective policy dissemination strategies, and evaluating trauma-informed approaches to health care system design and service delivery in urban areas.

Track C: Outcomes to Make Your Program Soar

Thea James MD is Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at Boston University and Boston Medical Center and is Director of the Boston Medical Center Site of the Massachusetts Violence Intervention Program.  She has served on the US Attorney General’s Taskforce on Toxic Stress Exposure to Children.  She speaks extensively on violence and its effects on communities, particularly on children.

Marlene Melzer-Lange MD received her medical degree from the Medical College of Wisconsin and completed her pediatric residency at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. As a pediatric emergency medicine physician she has witnessed the devastation of youth violence. She serves as medical director for Project Ujima, a long-standing violence intervention program. She is a Professor of Pediatrics at the Medical College of Wisconsin and her scholarly interest is violence and violence intervention amongst youth victims of violence. She has presented violence intervention topics at NNHVIP as well as other national and international conferences.

Jermaine Belcher is a Community Liaison with Project Ujima, a Youth Violence Prevention & Intervention program through Children’s Hospital & Community Services of Wisconsin. He has over 15 years of experience working with at-risk youth. Jermaine has conducted numerous workshops and presentations on Youth Violence, Restorative Justice and Conflict Resolution at numerous schools and colleges, and national conferences. In addition, Jermaine has worked with school ddministrators and their staff, including parents, on developing and implementing anti-bullying programs. Prior to his current role, Jermaine was a staffer for former U.S. Congressman Tom Barrett, addressing the needs of veterans, active duty military and their families. Jermaine also had the opportunity to oversee Barrett’s Youth Advisory Board, empowering youth to achieve their goals. Jermaine is a proud U.S. Air Force Veteran.

 

Michael Levas, MD, is an Assistant Professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin in the Section of Pediatric Emergency Medicine.  Since joining the faculty at the Medical College, Dr Levas has been intimately involved with youth violence and injury prevention policy and research and is currently the Physician Liaison for Project Ujima.  He currently serves on the Global Health Advisory Council and the Violence Prevention Initiative at the Medical College.  His career goal is to reduce the burden of violence on our youth through establishing best practices in evaluation tools and methods.

Track D: Relational Principles and Cognitive Behavioral Interventions for Dealing with Trauma for Health and Medical Practitioners

Father Stan Bosch, S.T., Psy. D. is a member of The Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity, a Catholic religious community working with the poor and abandoned, and has worked with Los Angeles’s gang involved youth and adults for more than 30 years. In these past years, Fr. Stan’s work with inner city youth was featured in the National Geographic documentary “Inside LA Gang Wars”, as well as in various Los Angeles Times articles.

Fr. Stan holds a doctoral degree in psychology with an emphasis in Marriage and Family Therapy from the California Graduate Institute of the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  He is a psychotherapist, Co-Director of Mental Health/Personnel Development for gang intervention and staff workers with Soledad Enrichment Action (SEA), SEA’s Gang Reduction and Youth Development (GRYD) project, and SEA’s Caught in the Crossfire program.

Track E: Healing the Healers

Jason Ryterband is a Los Angeles-based mindfulness facilitator. He provides practical, relationship-centric guidance, leveraging mindfulness tools to cultivate empathy and enrich interpersonal connections. Using a combination of traditional Vipassana meditation techniques and modern psychological research, Jason empowers people to move toward more secure, authentic ways of being in the world.